Ten Great Reasons To Use Mixed Native Hedging In Our Gardens

By Mark - Garden for Pleasure Hedging, Ornamental gardening, Wildlife Gardening No Comments on Ten Great Reasons To Use Mixed Native Hedging In Our Gardens



When we visit the nursery or garden centre, be it locally or online, there is such a bewildering array of plants that can be used as hedging, and sometimes the advice for which to choose for one reason or another is not available. Below I have listed some of the reasons you may wish to use mixed native hedging in your garden.

Dog Rose

  1. An amazing haven for our wildlife including birds, insects and animals. Many of our native hedging plants provide berries and seeds on which they can feed, as well as providing shelter and nesting opportunities. These factors make this type of hedging important for biodiversity.
  2. Mixed native hedging has a huge season of interest provided by colourful leaves, flowers, berries and seeds.
  3. Native plants are adapted to the conditions in the UK and even to a particular area of the UK including soil types and weather conditions.
  4. Helps to prevent soil erosion.
  5. These plants can store carbon and reduce pollutants such as exhaust fumes to improve our environmental conditions and reduce the effects of climate change.
  6. The informality of a mixed native hedge and the fact that it will only need pruning annually or every other year, make it a low maintenance alternative to some other hedges.
  7. A mixed, native hedgerow makes a great security barrier and helps deter intruders, especially if some of the more thorny types are included. They also provide privacy.
  8. Makes a great windbreak to lessen damage to other more tender and vulnerable plants.
  9. Reduces noise from factors such as traffic, pedestrians and neighbours.
  10. Many of the native hedging plants are quick growing, making a good barrier in a short time.


Guelder Rose

To view the large range of native hedging plants at Thompson & Morgan

click here

 

Mark Snelling

All images copyright Thompson & Morgan



 

 

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